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$25 million to the university of michigan to build a state-of-the-art facility, the kohl center. since elected in 1988, herb kohl has been a champion for public education fighting to give students the tools they need to succeed in the modern workforce. he's made fighting crime in wisconsin and across the nation a priority, advancing investments in antidrug and antigang programs. he's worked to reduce juvenile crime and ensure private funding of state and local public agencies. he's been a strong voice for the wisconsin dairy farmers, a valued member of the judiciary committee, banking kph-lt, -- committee and the special committee on aging and done so much for the aging population in america today. he's been a leader in many different legislative initiatives. herb cole is a fine man, a wonderful human being, i so admire and appreciate him. he's a distinguished senator, a devoted representative to the people of wisconsin and his presence will be missed in the senate. i wish him the very, very best in his retirement. would the chair announce the business of the day. the presiding officer
of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
to brownsville. everyone in this chamber will miss her. i know i speak for all of my colleagues when i michigan wish kay bailey -- when i wish kay billy hutchison the i have best in the next exciting chapter of her life. i join with my colleagues in saying to you, via condios. mr. hatch: mr. president, i want to join in thanking kay for her great service here in the united states snavment i've worked very closely with her on a wide variety of issues and i have to say there's no more fires advocate. in fact, i have to say that all of our women senators are fierce advocates and we've been greatly benefited by having them herement and kay has parved the way for -- has paved the way for autumn in of senators, both male and fe female, to become better senators. kay bailey hutch song is a great senator. she worked her guts out the whole time she was here -- and she's still here, but she's going to retire this time. and she represented texas well. and all i can say is that she's been my friend all this time, and when i needed help from her, she was always there. i tried to be there for her when she ne
at that time. i took a look at it and when i got into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met was modeled -- bob dole and we became good friends even to this day. i asked him what are your plans. and he, without hesitating, said i'm going to be a clerk. after that i'm going to run for the state house, first opening in the commerce. that's where i'm going. i figured that's a good idea. so i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor when the territorial losses became available i ran for that office and when the state could came along i got to congress a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you came here. >> two terms in the house and in the senate. >> and then came here as a member of the house and who did you come here without that time? >> only one member of that time. >> you mentioned senator dole and the fact you were then in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service. he talks about being a friend of -- excuse me, the senator from wyoming, al simpso
? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. today i rise because middle-class families are counting on the house of representatives to do the right thing between now and the end of the year, which is just 19 days away for the house to pass the middle-class tax cuts that we sent them back in july. families need help. when we talk about fiscal cliff, the most important one is the -- what families are struggling with every day, and we only have 19 days until taxes on middle-class families go up by an average of $2,200 if the house of representatives doesn't act to make sure that 98% of the american public is protected from tax increases. as we know, we passed the middle-class tax cut act on july july 25. so far, the house has not acted. 19 days, they have 19 days until the end of this year in order to act. time is running out. country, a long-term plan for fiscal solvency and for our economy. and by the way, we'll never get out of debt with close to 12 million people out of work, so we better be focused on jobs and the economy as i am each and every d
to be united states district judge for the northern district of florida. terrence c.berg of michigan to be united states district judge for the eastern district of michigan. the presiding officer: under the previous order, there will be 15 minutes of debate divided in the usual form. the senior senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: thank you, mr. president. i ask unanimous consent to include my statements in the judicial nominees on the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. leahy: i ask unanimous consent to speak on my time without delaying the vote as if in morning business on another critical matter. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. leahy: mr. president, i have spoken on this subject many times on the floor. the people who are affected by violence against women wonder why the congress has delayed so on the violence against women reauthorization act, the bill we passed here in the senate. if violence -- if you're a victim of violence, you can't understand such delays. so i think it's time for the senate and the house to come together
president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: madam president, i understand now under the existing unanimous consent agreement that we are going to be proceeding to debate a judge. i would ask unanimous consent that immediately after the disposition of that nomination that i be the first democratic senator recognized when we return to the pending trade bill. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider calendar number 676, which the clerk will report. the clerk: nomination, michael p. shea of connecticut to be united states district judge. the presiding officer: the senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: madam president, the senate is finally being allowed to vote today on the nomination of michael shea to be a district judge in the united states district court for district -- the district of connecticut. it has taken a long time for this day to come but he will be confirmed, and i congratulate him and his family on his confirmation and i congratulat
? >> guest: that's a complicated question, and i can speak from my own experience. i live in michigan where i'm not permitted to marry, and, in fact, we are constitutionally prohibited to have heritage or similar yiewn your -- union purpose, the terrible language of our constitution. mark and i talked about getting married, say, in new york, where i'm from or another state just to, but there are complications in terms of depending on what said you then end up living in. >> host: i understand, but it's not legal where you live. the question is in places like canada or netherlands, you know, for a number of years now, and no more than 10% of people enter legal unions. >> guest: i think that's partly because in many cases, couples have already cobbled together certain limited legal structures to the extent that they can. mark and i have a big expensive binder at home, and people have done that. there's questions about how all of that get affected. i think that's partly because, as you know, given your work over the last several decades, a marriage culture takes time to build, and, you know, when
, senates from montana and michigan to come and tour the area because we are very concerned about senator -- scheduled 0 come and plan to but weather delayed to him. we have republicans and democrats with the eyes on the disasters. one of the reasons we are here today, however, to make sure that the federal government through the small business administration is doing everything in the power to assist the thousands of small businesses that have been hurt in this national disaster. by and large, the federal response has been robust to hurricane sandy. more than 500,000 people have registered for temporary houses and individual assistance, fema, there on the ground right away as provided over 15 million meals, 20 million leaders of water, -- liters of water, 1.7 million blankets and 135,000 tarps. dodd has delivered 9.3 million gasoline and 270 million gallons of salt water have been pumped out of transit tunnels. there have been over 17,000 personnel and 15,000 national gassermen. i want to thank the first responders from every level from fire houses to police stations to volunteers in the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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